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6 definitions found
 for rococo
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rococo \Ro*co"co\, n. [F.; of uncertain etymology.]
     A florid style of ornamentation which prevailed in Europe in
     the latter part of the eighteenth century.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rococo \Ro*co"co\, a.
     Of or pertaining to the style called rococo; like rococo;
     florid; fantastic.
     [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  rococo
      adj 1: having excessive asymmetrical ornamentation; "an
             exquisite gilded rococo mirror"
      n 1: fanciful but graceful asymmetric ornamentation in art and
           architecture that originated in France in the 18th century

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  80 Moby Thesaurus words for "rococo":
     Gothic, arabesque, archaic, baroque, baroqueness, bizarre,
     brain-born, busy, bygone, chichi, chinoiserie, dated, deformed,
     dream-built, elaborate, elaborateness, elegance, elegant,
     extravagant, fanciful, fanciness, fancy, fancy-born, fancy-built,
     fancy-woven, fantasque, fantastic, fine, fineness, flamboyance,
     flamboyant, florid, floridity, floridness, floweriness, flowery,
     freak, freakish, frilly, fussy, grotesque, high-wrought, labored,
     luxuriance, luxuriant, luxurious, luxuriousness, maggoty,
     malformed, misbegotten, misshapen, moldy, monstrous, moresque,
     moth-eaten, notional, old hat, ornate, ostentation, ostentatious,
     outdated, outlandish, overelaborate, overelaborateness,
     overelegance, overelegant, overlabored, overornamentation,
     overworked, overwrought, passe, picturesque, preposterous,
     pretty-pretty, rich, richness, teratogenic, teratoid, whimsical,
     wild
  
  

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  rococo
   adj.
  
      Terminally baroque. Used to imply that a program has become so encrusted
      with the software equivalent of gold leaf and curlicues that they have
      completely swamped the underlying design. Called after the later and more
      extreme forms of Baroque architecture and decoration prevalent during the
      mid-1700s in Europe. Alan Perlis said: ?Every program eventually becomes
      rococo, and then rubble.? Compare critical mass.
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (30 December 2018) :

  rococo
  
      Baroque in the extreme.  Used to imply that
     a program has become so encrusted with the software equivalent
     of gold leaf and curlicues that they have completely swamped
     the underlying design.  Called after the later and more
     extreme forms of Baroque architecture and decoration prevalent
     during the mid-1700s in Europe.  Alan Perlis said: "Every
     program eventually becomes rococo, and then rubble."
  
     Compare critical mass.
  
     [{Jargon File]
  
     (1996-04-06)
  

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