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5 definitions found
 for Booting
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Boot \Boot\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Booted; p. pr. & vb. n.
     Booting.]
     1. To profit; to advantage; to avail; -- generally followed
        by it; as, what boots it?
        [1913 Webster]
  
              What booteth it to others that we wish them well,
              and do nothing for them?              --Hooker.
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              What subdued
              To change like this a mind so far imbued
              With scorn of man, it little boots to know. --Byron.
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              What boots to us your victories?      --Southey.
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     2. To enrich; to benefit; to give in addition. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              And I will boot thee with what gift beside
              Thy modesty can beg.                  --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Booting \Boot"ing\, n.
     Advantage; gain; gain by plunder; booty. [Obs.] --Sir. J.
     Harrington.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Boot \Boot\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Booted; p. pr. & vb. n.
     Booting.]
     1. To put boots on, esp. for riding.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Coated and booted for it.             --B. Jonson.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To punish by kicking with a booted foot. [U. S.]
        [1913 Webster]
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Booting \Boot"ing\, n.
     1. A kind of torture. See Boot, n., 2.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A kicking, as with a booted foot. [U. S.]
        [1913 Webster]

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (30 December 2018) :

  bootstrap
  boot
  booting
  
      To load and initialise the
     operating system on a computer.  Normally abbreviated to
     "{boot".  From the curious expression "to pull oneself up by
     one's bootstraps", one of the legendary feats of Baron von
     Munchhausen.  The bootstrap loader is the program that runs
     on the computer before any (normal) program can run.  Derived
     terms include reboot, cold boot, warm boot, soft boot
     and hard boot.
  
     The term also applies to the use of a compiler to compile
     itself.  The usual process is to write an interpreter for a
     language, L, in some other existing language.  The compiler is
     then written in L and the interpreter is used to run it.  This
     produces an executable for compiling programs in L from the
     source of the compiler in L.  This technique is often used to
     verify the correctness of a compiler.  It was first used in
     the LISP community.
  
     See also My Favourite Toy Language.
  
     [{Jargon File]
  
     (2005-04-12)
  

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