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3 definitions found
 for Stir
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Stir \Stir\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Stirred; p. pr. & vb. n.
     Stirring.] [OE. stiren, steren, sturen, AS. styrian;
     probably akin to D. storen to disturb, G. st["o]ren, OHG.
     st[=o]ren to scatter, destroy. [root]166.]
     1. To change the place of in any manner; to move.
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              My foot I had never yet in five days been able to
              stir.                                 --Sir W.
                                                    Temple.
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     2. To disturb the relative position of the particles of, as
        of a liquid, by passing something through it; to agitate;
        as, to stir a pudding with a spoon.
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              My mind is troubled, like a fountain stirred.
                                                    --Shak.
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     3. To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
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              Stir not questions of jurisdiction.   --Bacon.
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     4. To incite to action; to arouse; to instigate; to prompt;
        to excite. "To stir men to devotion." --Chaucer.
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              An Ate, stirring him to blood and strife. --Shak.
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              And for her sake some mutiny will stir. --Dryden.
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     Note: In all senses except the first, stir is often followed
           by up with an intensive effect; as, to stir up fire; to
           stir up sedition.
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     Syn: To move; incite; awaken; rouse; animate; stimulate;
          excite; provoke.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Stir \Stir\, v. i.
     1. To move; to change one's position.
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              I had not power to stir or strive,
              But felt that I was still alive.      --Byron.
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     2. To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or
        busy one's self.
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              All are not fit with them to stir and toil. --Byron.
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              The friends of the unfortunate exile, far from
              resenting his unjust suspicions, were stirring
              anxiously in his behalf.              --Merivale.
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     3. To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
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              They fancy they have a right to talk freely upon
              everything that stirs or appears.     --I. Watts.
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     4. To rise, or be up, in the morning. [Colloq.] --Shak.
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From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Stir \Stir\, n.
     1. The act or result of stirring; agitation; tumult; bustle;
        noise or various movements.
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              Why all these words, this clamor, and this stir?
                                                    --Denham.
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              Consider, after so much stir about genus and
              species, how few words we have yet settled
              definitions of.                       --Locke.
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     2. Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder;
        seditious uproar.
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              Being advertised of some stirs raised by his
              unnatural sons in England.            --Sir J.
                                                    Davies.
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     3. Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.
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