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2 definitions found
 for Innate
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Innate \In*nate"\, v. t.
     To cause to exit; to call into being. [Obs.] "The first
     innating cause." --Marston.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Innate \In"nate\ ([i^]n"n[asl]t or [i^]n*n[=a]t"; 277), a. [L.
     innatus; pref. in- in + natus born, p. p. of nasci to be
     born. See Native.]
     1. Inborn; native; natural; as, innate vigor; innate
        eloquence.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. (Metaph.) Originating in, or derived from, the
        constitution of the intellect, as opposed to acquired from
        experience; as, innate ideas. See A priori, Intuitive.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              There is an innate light in every man, discovering
              to him the first lines of duty in the common notions
              of good and evil.                     --South.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Men would not be guilty if they did not carry in
              their mind common notions of morality, innate and
              written in divine letters.            --Fleming
                                                    (Origen).
        [1913 Webster]
  
              If I could only show, as I hope I shall . . . how
              men, barely by the use of their natural faculties,
              may attain to all the knowledge they have, without
              the help of any innate impressions; and may arrive
              at certainty without any such original notions or
              principles.                           --Locke.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. (Bot.) Joined by the base to the very tip of a filament;
        as, an innate anther. --Gray.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Innate ideas (Metaph.), ideas, as of God, immortality,
        right and wrong, supposed by some to be inherent in the
        mind, as a priori principles of knowledge.
        [1913 Webster]

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