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5 definitions found
 for Calk
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Calk \Calk\ (k[a^]lk), v. t. [E.calquer to trace, It. caicare to
     trace, to trample, fr. L. calcare to trample, fr. calx heel.
     Cf. Calcarate.]
     To copy, as a drawing, by rubbing the back of it with red or
     black chalk, and then passing a blunt style or needle over
     the lines, so as to leave a tracing on the paper or other
     thing against which it is laid or held. [Written also
     calque]
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Calk \Calk\ (k[add]k), n. [Cf. AS. calc shoe, hoof, L. calx,
     calcis, heel, calcar, spur.]
     1. A sharp-pointed piece of iron or steel projecting downward
        on the shoe of a horse or an ox, to prevent the animal
        from slipping; -- called also calker, calkin.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. An instrument with sharp points, worn on the sole of a
        shoe or boot, to prevent slipping.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. same as caulk[2], n..
        [PJC]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Calk \Calk\ (k[add]k), v. i.
     1. To furnish with calks, to prevent slipping on ice; as, to
        calk the shoes of a horse or an ox.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To wound with a calk; as when a horse injures a leg or a
        foot with a calk on one of the other feet.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. same as caulk[2], v. t..
        [PJC]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Calk \Calk\ (k[add]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Calked; p. pr. &
     vb. n. Calking.] [Either corrupted fr. F. calfater (cf. Pg.
     calafetar, Sp. calafetear), fr. Ar. qalafa to fill up
     crevices with the fibers of palm tree or moss; or fr. OE.
     cauken to tred, through the French fr. L. calcare, fr. calx
     heel. Cf. Calk to copy, Inculcate.]
     1. To drive tarred oakum into the seams between the planks of
        (a ship, boat, etc.), to prevent leaking. The calking is
        completed by smearing the seams with melted pitch.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To make an indentation in the edge of a metal plate, as
        along a seam in a steam boiler or an iron ship, to force
        the edge of the upper plate hard against the lower and so
        fill the crevice.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Caulk \Caulk\, n.
     1. See Calk.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. a viscous semisolid material of varying composition used
        to fill in seams of objects which are exposed to water,
        such as wooden ships or bath tiles; -- called also calk
        and caulking. After applying in a semisolid form, the
        material hardens and dries to form a waterproof seal. It
        is used in the process of caulking. It is sometimes
        applied together with a rope-like cord to fill larger
        seams.
        [PJC]

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