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7 definitions found
 for stanch
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Stanch \Stanch\, v. i.
     To cease, as the flowing of blood.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           Immediately her issue of blood stanched. --Luke viii.
                                                    44.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Stanch \Stanch\, n.
     1. That which stanches or checks. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A flood gate by which water is accumulated, for floating a
        boat over a shallow part of a stream by its release.
        --Knight.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Stanch \Stanch\ (st[.a]nch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Stanched
     (st[.a]ncht); p. pr. & vb. n. Stanching.] [OF. estanchier,
     F. ['e]tancher to stop a liquid from flowing; akin to Pr.,
     Sp., & Pg. estancar, It. stancare to weary, LL. stancare,
     stagnare, to stanch, fr. L. stagnare to be or make stagnant.
     See Stagnate.]
     1. To stop the flowing of, as blood; to check; also, to stop
        the flowing of blood from; as, to stanch a wound. [Written
        also staunch.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Iron or a stone laid to the neck doth stanch the
              bleeding of the nose.                 --Bacon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To extinguish; to quench, as fire or thirst. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Stanch \Stanch\, a. [Compar. Stancher (-[~e]r); superl.
     Stanchest.] [From Stanch, v. t., and hence literally
     signifying, stopped or stayed; cf. Sp. estanco stopped,
     tight, not leaky, as a ship. See Stanch, v. t.] [Written
     also staunch.]
     1. Strong and tight; sound; firm; as, a stanch ship.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              One of the closets is parqueted with plain deal, set
              in diamond, exceeding stanch and pretty. --Evelyn.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Firm in principle; constant and zealous; loyal; hearty;
        steady; steadfast; as, a stanch churchman; a stanch friend
        or adherent. --V. Knox.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              In politics I hear you 're stanch.    --Prior.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Close; secret; private. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              This is to be kept stanch.            --Locke.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Stanch \Stanch\, v. t.
     To prop; to make stanch, or strong.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           His gathered sticks to stanch the wall
           Of the snow tower when snow should fall. --Emerson.
     [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  stanch
      v 1: stop the flow of a liquid; "staunch the blood flow"; "stem
           the tide" [syn: stem, stanch, staunch, halt]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  83 Moby Thesaurus words for "stanch":
     arrest, asphyxiate, bar, bind, block, block up, blockade,
     bottle up, bung, caulk, cease, censor, check, chink, choke,
     choke off, choke up, clamp down on, clog, clog up, congest,
     constipate, cork, cork up, cover, crack down on, crush, dam,
     dam up, damp down, drown, end, extinguish, fill, fill up, foul,
     gag, halt, hold down, jam, jump on, keep down, keep under, kill,
     muzzle, obstipate, obstruct, pack, plug, plug up, pour water on,
     prevent, put down, quash, quell, quench, repress, shut down on,
     silence, sit down on, sit on, smash, smother, spile, squash,
     squelch, staunch, stay, stem, stench, stifle, stop, stop up,
     stopper, stopple, strangle, stuff, stuff up, stultify, subdue,
     suffocate, suppress, throttle
  
  

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