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5 definitions found
 for shadowing
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Shadow \Shad"ow\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shadowed; p. pr. & vb.
     n. Shadowing.] [OE. shadowen, AS. sceadwian. See adow,
     n.]
     1. To cut off light from; to put in shade; to shade; to throw
        a shadow upon; to overspead with obscurity.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The warlike elf much wondered at this tree,
              So fair and great, that shadowed all the ground.
                                                    --Spenser.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To conceal; to hide; to screen. [R.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Let every soldier hew him down a bough.
              And bear't before him; thereby shall we shadow
              The numbers of our host.              --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To protect; to shelter from danger; to shroud.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Shadowing their right under your wings of war.
                                                    --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. To mark with gradations of light or color; to shade.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. To represent faintly or imperfectly; to adumbrate; hence,
        to represent typically.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Augustus is shadowed in the person of [AE]neas.
                                                    --Dryden.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. To cloud; to darken; to cast a gloom over.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The shadowed livery of the burnished sun. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Why sad?
              I must not see the face O love thus shadowed.
                                                    --Beau. & Fl.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     7. To attend as closely as a shadow; to follow and watch
        closely, especially in a secret or unobserved manner; as,
        a detective shadows a criminal.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Shadowing \Shad"ow*ing\, n.
     1. Shade, or gradation of light and color; shading.
        --Feltham.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A faint representation; an adumbration.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              There are . . . in savage theology shadowings,
              quaint or majestic, of the conception of a Supreme
              Deity.                                --Tylor.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  shadowing
      n 1: the act of following someone secretly [syn: shadowing,
           tailing]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  71 Moby Thesaurus words for "shadowing":
     ambuscade, ambush, ambushment, blackening, blind,
     blocking the light, booby trap, bugging, chase, chasing,
     cloak-and-dagger work, clouding, counterespionage,
     counterintelligence, darkening, dimming, dogging, eclipsing,
     electronic surveillance, espial, espionage, extinguishment, follow,
     follow-up, following, heeling, hounding, hue and cry, hunting,
     intelligence, intelligence work, lurking hole,
     military intelligence, obfuscation, obnubilation, obscuration,
     obscurement, observation, obumbration, occulting, overcast,
     overclouding, overshading, overshadowing, overshadowment,
     prosecution, pursual, pursuance, pursuing, pursuit, quest,
     searching, secret police, secret service, seeking, sequel,
     sequence, series, shading, spying, stakeout, stalking,
     stalking-horse, surveillance, tailing, tracking, tracking down,
     trailing, trap, wiretap, wiretapping
  
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (30 December 2018) :

  aliasing
  shadowing
  
     1.  When several different identifiers refer to the
     same object.  The term is very general and is used in many
     contexts.
  
     See alias, aliasing bug, anti-aliasing.
  
     2.  (Or "shadowing") Where a hardware device
     responds at multiple addresses because it only decodes a
     subset of the address lines, so different values on the
     other lines are ignored.
  
     (1998-03-13)
  

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