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10 definitions found
 for rave
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rave \Rave\ (r[=a]v), obs.
     imp. of Rive.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rave \Rave\, n. [Prov. E. raves, or rathes, a frame laid on a
     wagon, for carrying hay, etc.]
     One of the upper side pieces of the frame of a wagon body or
     a sleigh.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rave \Rave\ (r[=a]v), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Raved (r[=a]vd); p.
     pr. & vb. n. Raving.] [F. r[^e]ver to rave, to be
     delirious, to dream; perhaps fr. L. rabere to rave, rage, be
     mad or furious. Cf. Rage, Reverie.]
     1. To wander in mind or intellect; to be delirious; to talk
        or act irrationally; to be wild, furious, or raging, as a
        madman.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              In our madness evermore we rave.      --Chaucer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast?
                                                    --Addison.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The mingled torrent of redcoats and tartans went
              raving down the valley to the gorge of
              Killiecrankie.                        --Macaulay.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To rush wildly or furiously. --Spenser.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To talk with unreasonable enthusiasm or excessive passion
        or excitement; -- followed by about, of, or on; as, he
        raved about her beauty.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The hallowed scene
              Which others rave of, though they know it not.
                                                    --Byron.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rave \Rave\, v. t.
     To utter in madness or frenzy; to say wildly; as, to rave
     nonsense. --Young.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Rave \Rave\, n.
     1. An instance of raving.
        [PJC]
  
     2. A highly flattering or enthusiastic review of a play,
        book, etc.
        [PJC]
  
     3. A clamorous dance party, especially one featuring a band
        or disc jockey playing loud modern rock music oriented
        toward young people, held in a large room such as a
        warehouse, often organized by an informal or ad hoc
        sponsor. [originally British slang]
        [PJC]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  rave
      n 1: a dance party that lasts all night and electronically
           synthesized music is played; "raves are very popular in
           Berlin"
      2: an extravagantly enthusiastic review; "he gave it a rave"
      v 1: participate in an all-night techno dance party
      2: talk in a noisy, excited, or declamatory manner [syn: rant,
         mouth off, jabber, spout, rabbit on, rave]
      3: praise enthusiastically; "She raved about that new
         restaurant" [syn: rave, gush]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  183 Moby Thesaurus words for "rave":
     abuse, acclaim, accolade, admiration, applaud, assault, attack,
     babble, barbarize, bark at, bash, batter, be angry,
     be enthusiastic, be excitable, be insane, be livid, be pissed,
     bellow, berate, betongue, blacken, blast, blow a gasket, blow up,
     bluff, bluster, bluster and bluff, boil, bounce, bouquet, brag,
     browned off, brutalize, bubble over, bully, burn, butcher,
     carry on, carry on over, catch fire, catch the infection,
     caterwaul, chafe, come apart, craze, declaim, destroy, do, dote,
     drivel, drool, effervesce, encomium, enthuse, excite easily,
     execrate, explode, fad, fashion, favor, fete, fire up, flame up,
     flare up, flash up, flip, fret, fulminate, fulminate against, fume,
     gasconade, get excited, go into hysterics, go on, go on over, gush,
     gush over, hammer, harangue, have a conniption, have a demon,
     have a tantrum, hector, hit the ceiling, hosanna, howl, intimidate,
     jaw, last word, laud, lay waste, load with reproaches, loot,
     make much of, mania, maul, mouth, mug, out-herod Herod, party,
     perorate, pillage, pissed off, plaudits, praise, rag, rage,
     rail at, raise Cain, raise hell, raise the devil, raise the roof,
     ramble, ramp, rampage, rant, rant and rave, rape, rate, rave about,
     rave against, revile, rhapsodize, rhapsody, riot, roar, roister,
     rollick, ruin, run a temperature, run amok, run mad, sack, savage,
     scream, seethe, shout, simmer, sizzle, slang, slaughter, slaver,
     slobber, smoke, smolder, soapbox, soiree, sow chaos, splutter,
     sputter, stew, storm, swagger, swashbuckle, take fire, take on,
     take on over, tear, tear around, terrorize, testimonial, thing,
     throw a fit, thunder, thunder against, tongue-lash, trend, tribute,
     turn a hair, vandalize, vapor, vilify, violate, vituperate, vogue,
     wander, wingding, wreck, yell, yell at, yelp at, yowl
  
  

From V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (February 2016) :

  RAVE
         Relational Advanced Visual Environment
         

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  rave
   vi.
  
      [WPI]
  
      1. To persist in discussing a specific subject.
  
      2. To speak authoritatively on a subject about which one knows very little.
  
      3. To complain to a person who is not in a position to correct the
      difficulty.
  
      4. To purposely annoy another person verbally.
  
      5. To evangelize. See flame.
  
      6. Also used to describe a less negative form of blather, such as friendly
      bullshitting. ?Rave? differs slightly from flame in that rave implies
      that it is the persistence or obliviousness of the person speaking that is
      annoying, while flame implies somewhat more strongly that the tone or
      content is offensive as well.
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (30 December 2018) :

  rave
  
     [WPI] 1. To persist in discussing a specific subject.
  
     2. To speak authoritatively on a subject about which one knows
     very little.
  
     3. To complain to a person who is not in a position to correct
     the difficulty.
  
     4. To purposely annoy another person verbally.
  
     5. To evangelise.  See flame.
  
     6. Also used to describe a less negative form of blather, such
     as friendly bullshitting.  "Rave" differs slightly from
     flame in that "rave" implies that it is the persistence or
     obliviousness of the person speaking that is annoying, while
     flame implies somewhat more strongly that the tone or
     content is offensive as well.
  
     [{Jargon File]
  

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