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5 definitions found
 for prelude
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Prelude \Pre*lude"\, v. t.
     1. To introduce with a previous performance; to play or
        perform a prelude to; as, to prelude a concert with a
        lively air.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To serve as prelude to; to precede as introductory.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              [Music] preluding some great tragedy. --Longfellow
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Prelude \Pre"lude\, n. [F. pr['e]lude (cf. It. preludio, LL.
     praeludium), fr. L. prae before + ludus play. See Prelude,
     v. t.]
     An introductory performance, preceding and preparing for the
     principal matter; a preliminary part, movement, strain, etc.;
     especially (Mus.), a strain introducing the theme or chief
     subject; a movement introductory to a fugue, yet independent;
     -- with recent composers often synonymous with overture.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           The last Georgic was a good prelude to the Aenis
                                                    --Addison.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           The cause is more than the prelude, the effect is more
           than the sequel, of the fact.            --Whewell.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Preface; introduction; preliminary; preamble;
          forerunner; harbinger; precursor.
          [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Prelude \Pre*lude"\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Preluded; p. pr. &
     vb. n. Preluding.] [L. praeludere, praelusum; prae before +
     ludere to play: cf. F. pr['e]luder. See Ludicrous.]
     To play an introduction or prelude; to give a prefatory
     performance; to serve as prelude.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           The musicians preluded on their instruments. --Sir. W.
                                                    Scott.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           We are preluding too largely, and must come at once to
           the point.                               --Jeffrey.
     [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  prelude
      n 1: something that serves as a preceding event or introduces
           what follows; "training is a necessary preliminary to
           employment"; "drinks were the overture to dinner" [syn:
           preliminary, overture, prelude]
      2: music that precedes a fugue or introduces an act in an opera
      v 1: serve as a prelude or opening to
      2: play as a prelude

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  54 Moby Thesaurus words for "prelude":
     Vorspiel, antecedence, antecedency, anteposition, anteriority,
     avant-propos, breakthrough, concert overture, curtain raiser,
     descant, dominion, dramatic overture, exordium, foreword,
     front matter, front position, frontispiece, innovation, introduce,
     introduction, leap, operatic overture, overture, postulate,
     preamble, precedence, precedency, preceding, precession, precursor,
     preface, preference, prefix, prefixation, prefixture, preliminary,
     premise, presupposition, priority, proem, prolegomena,
     prolegomenon, prolepsis, prologize, prologue, protasis, prothesis,
     superiority, the lead, top priority, urgency, vamp, verse,
     voluntary
  
  

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