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4 definitions found
 for parlour
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Parlor \Par"lor\, n. [OE. parlour, parlur, F. parloir, LL.
     parlatorium. See Parley.] [Written also parlour.]
     1. A room for business or social conversation, for the
        reception of guests, etc. Specifically:
        (a) The apartment in a monastery or nunnery where the
            inmates are permitted to meet and converse with each
            other, or with visitors and friends from without.
            --Piers Plowman.
        (b) In large private houses, a sitting room for the family
            and for familiar guests, -- a room for less formal
            uses than the drawing-room. Esp., in modern times, the
            dining room of a house having few apartments, as a
            London house, where the dining parlor is usually on
            the ground floor.
        (c) Commonly, in the United States, a drawing-room, or the
            room where visitors are received and entertained; a
            room in a private house where people can sit and talk
            and relax, not usually the same as the dining room.
            [1913 Webster +PJC]
  
     Note: "In England people who have a drawing-room no longer
           call it a parlor, as they called it of old and till
           recently." --Fitzed. Hall.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A room in an inn or club where visitors can be received.
        [WordNet 1.5]
  
     Parlor car. See Palace car, under Car.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  parlour \parlour\ n.
     1. Same as parlor.
  
     Syn: living room, sitting room, front room, parlor.
          [WordNet 1.5]
  
     2. A room in an inn or club where visitors can be received.
  
     Syn: parlor.
          [WordNet 1.5]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  parlour
      n 1: reception room in an inn or club where visitors can be
           received [syn: parlor, parlour]
      2: a room in a private house or establishment where people can
         sit and talk and relax [syn: living room, living-room,
         sitting room, front room, parlor, parlour]

From Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary :

  Parlour
     (from the Fr. parler, "to speak") denotes an "audience chamber,"
     but that is not the import of the Hebrew word so rendered. It
     corresponds to what the Turks call a kiosk, as in Judg. 3:20
     (the "summer parlour"), or as in the margin of the Revised
     Version ("the upper chamber of cooling"), a small room built on
     the roof of the house, with open windows to catch the breeze,
     and having a door communicating with the outside by which
     persons seeking an audience may be admitted. While Eglon was
     resting in such a parlour, Ehud, under pretence of having a
     message from God to him, was admitted into his presence, and
     murderously plunged his dagger into his body (21, 22).
     
       The "inner parlours" in 1 Chr. 28:11 were the small rooms or
     chambers which Solomon built all round two sides and one end of
     the temple (1 Kings 6:5), "side chambers;" or they may have
     been, as some think, the porch and the holy place.
     
       In 1 Sam. 9:22 the Revised Version reads "guest chamber," a
     chamber at the high place specially used for sacrificial feasts.
     

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