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4 definitions found
 for jammed
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Jam \Jam\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Jammed (j[a^]md); p. pr. & vb.
     n. Jamming.] [Either fr. jamb, as if squeezed between
     jambs, or more likely from the same source as champ See
     Champ.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. To press into a close or tight position; to crowd; to
        squeeze; to wedge in; to cram; as, rock fans jammed the
        theater for the concert.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The ship . . . jammed in between two rocks. --De
                                                    Foe.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To crush or bruise; as, to jam a finger in the crack of a
        door. [Colloq.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. (Naut.) To bring (a vessel) so close to the wind that half
        her upper sails are laid aback. --W. C. Russell.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. To block or obstruct by packing too much (people or
        objects) into; as, shoppers jammed the aisles during the
        fire sale.
        [PJC]
  
     5. (Radio) To interfere with (a radio signal) by sending
        other signals of the same or nearby frequency; as, the
        Soviets jammed Radio Free Europe broadcasts for years
        during the cold war.
        [PJC]
  
     6. To cause to become nonfunctional by putting something in
        that blocks the movement of a part or parts; as, he jammed
        the drawer by putting in too many loose papers; he jammed
        the lock by trying to pick it.
        [PJC]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  jammed \jammed\ adj.
     filled to capacity or overfilled; as, the auditorium was
     jammed to the rafters.
  
     Syn: full, jam-packed, packed.
          [WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  jammed
      adj 1: filled to capacity; "a suitcase jammed with dirty
             clothes"; "stands jam-packed with fans"; "a packed
             theater" [syn: jammed, jam-packed, packed]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  163 Moby Thesaurus words for "jammed":
     aground, alive with, anchored, arrested, back, backward,
     behindhand, belated, bloated, blocked, bonded, bound, brimful,
     brimming, bristling, bursting, caught, cemented, chained,
     chock-full, choked, choked up, clogged, clogged up, close,
     close-knit, close-textured, close-woven, compact, compacted,
     compressed, concentrated, concrete, condensed, congested,
     consolidated, constipated, costive, crammed, crammed full,
     crawling, crowded, crowding, delayed, delayed-action, dense,
     detained, distended, drenched, fast, fastened,
     filled to overflowing, firm, fixed, foul, fouled, full, glued,
     gluey, glutted, gorged, grounded, hard, heavy, held, held up,
     high and dry, hung up, hyperemic, impacted, impenetrable,
     impermeable, in a bind, in abeyance, in profusion, in spate,
     inextricable, infarcted, jam-packed, late, latish, lavish, massive,
     moored, moratory, never on time, nonporous, obstipated, obstructed,
     overblown, overburdened, overcharged, overdue, overfed,
     overflowing, overfraught, overfreighted, overfull, overladen,
     overloaded, overstocked, overstuffed, oversupplied, overweighted,
     packed, plethoric, plugged, plugged up, populous, prodigal,
     profuse, proliferating, prolific, ready to burst, retarded, rife,
     running over, satiated, saturated, secure, serried, set, slow,
     soaked, solid, stopped, stopped up, stranded, stuck, stuck fast,
     studded, stuffed, stuffed up, substantial, superabundant,
     supercharged, supersaturated, surcharged, surfeited, swarming,
     swollen, taped, tardy, teeming, tethered, thick, thick as hail,
     thick with, thick-coming, thick-growing, thickset, thronged,
     thronging, tied, tight, transfixed, unpunctual, unready, untimely,
     viscid, viscose, viscous, wedged
  
  

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