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6 definitions found
 for convict
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Convict \Con*vict"\ (k[o^]n*v[i^]kt"), p. a. [L. convictus, p.
     p. of convincere to convict, prove. See Convice.]
     Proved or found guilty; convicted. [Obs.] --Shak.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           Convict by flight, and rebel to all law. --Milton.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Convict \Con"vict\ (k[o^]n"v[i^]kt), n.
     1. A person proved guilty of a crime alleged against him; one
        legally convicted or sentenced to punishment for some
        crime.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A criminal sentenced to penal servitude.
  
     Syn: Malefactor; culprit; felon; criminal.
          [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Convict \Con*vict"\ (k[o^]n*v[i^]kt"), v. t. [imp. & p. p.
     Convicted; p. pr. & vb. n. Convicting.]
     1. To prove or find guilty of an offense or crime charged; to
        pronounce guilty, as by legal decision, or by one's
        conscience.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              He [Baxter] . . . had been convicted by a jury.
                                                    --Macaulay.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              They which heard it, being convicted by their own
              conscience, went out one by one.      --John viii.
                                                    9.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To prove or show to be false; to confute; to refute.
        [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To demonstrate by proof or evidence; to prove.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Imagining that these proofs will convict a
              testament, to have that in it which other men can
              nowhere by reading find.              --Hooker.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. To defeat; to doom to destruction. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              A whole armado of convicted sail.     --Shak.
  
     Syn: To confute; defect; convince; confound.
          [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  convict
      n 1: a person serving a sentence in a jail or prison [syn:
           convict, con, inmate, yard bird, yardbird]
      2: a person who has been convicted of a criminal offense
      v 1: find or declare guilty; "The man was convicted of fraud and
           sentenced" [ant: acquit, assoil, clear, discharge,
           exculpate, exonerate]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  84 Moby Thesaurus words for "convict":
     Judas, POW, acquit, anathematize, assure, attaint, be convincing,
     betrayer, blacklist, bring home to, bring over, bring round,
     bring to reason, cageling, captive, carry conviction, censure,
     chain gang, con, condemn, convert, convince, criminal, crook, damn,
     deceiver, denounce, denunciate, desperado, desperate criminal,
     detenu, doom, double-dealer, drive home to, ex-convict,
     excommunicate, felon, find guilty, fugitive, gallows bird,
     gangster, gaolbird, inspire belief, internee, jailbird, lag,
     lawbreaker, lead to believe, lifer, loser, mobster, outlaw,
     parolee, pass sentence, pass sentence on, penalize, persuade,
     political prisoner, prisoner, prisoner of war, pronounce judgment,
     pronounce sentence, proscribe, public enemy, quisling, racketeer,
     recidivist, repeater, satisfy, scofflaw, sell, sell one on,
     sentence, stir bird, swindler, talk over, thief, thug,
     ticket-of-leave man, ticket-of-leaver, traitor, trusty, two-timer,
     win over
  
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  CONVICT. One who has been condemned by a competent court. This term is wore 
  commonly applied to one who has been convicted of a crime or misdemeanor. 
  There are various local acts which punish the importation of convicts. 
  
  

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