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4 definitions found
 for collocation
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Collocation \Col`lo*ca"tion\, n. [L. collocatio.]
     1. The act of placing; the state of being placed with
        something else; disposition in place; arrangement.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The choice and collocation of words.  --Sir W.
                                                    Jones.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. (Linguistics) a combination of related words within a
        sentence that occurs more frequently than would be
        predicted in a random arrangement of words; a combination
        of words that occurs with sufficient frequency to be
        recongizable as a common combination, especially a pair of
        words that occur adjacent to each other. Also called
        stable collocation. Combinations of words having
        intervening words between them, such as verb and object
        pairs, may also be collocations.
        [PJC]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  collocation
      n 1: a grouping of words in a sentence
      2: the act of positioning close together (or side by side); "it
         is the result of the juxtaposition of contrasting colors"
         [syn: juxtaposition, apposition, collocation]

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (30 December 2018) :

  co-location
  collocation
  
      /koh'loh-kay`sh*n/ or /koh`loh-kay'sh*n/ (Or
     "colocation") Providing network connections such as Internet
     leased lines to several servers housed together in a
     server room.  This is typically provided as a commercial
     service.
  
     The hyphenated form is correct and the most common on the web,
     followed by "colocation".  "collocation" (/ko`loh-kay'sh*n/,
     not /koh'-/), is an old word with a similar meaning.  It is
     common in dictionaries and follows the pattern of other
     Latin-derived words like collect, college, and collate, but is
     least common on the web.
  
     The verbal form is "to colocate" or "co-locate" (commonly
     /koh'loh`kayt/, also (US) /koh`loh'kayt/).
  
     (2000-10-03)
  

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  COLLOCATION, French law. The act by which the creditors of an estate are 
  arranged in the order in which they are to be paid according to law. The 
  order in which the creditors-are placed, is also called collocation. Merl. 
  Rep. h.t. Vide Marshalling Assets. 
  
  

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