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5 definitions found
 for Mineral water
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Soda \So"da\, n. [It., soda, in OIt., ashes used in making
     glass, fr. L. solida, fem. of solidus solid; solida having
     probably been a name of glasswort. See Solid.]
     1. (Chem.)
        (a) Sodium oxide or hydroxide.
        (b) Popularly, sodium carbonate or bicarbonate. Sodium
            bicarbonate is also called baking soda
            [1913 Webster]
  
     2. same as sodium, used in terms such as bicarbonate of
        soda.
        [PJC]
  
     3. same as soda water.
        [PJC]
  
     4. a non-alcoholic beverage, sweetened by various means,
        containing flavoring and supersaturated with carbon
        dioxide, so as to be effervescent when the container is
        opened; -- in different localities it is variously called
        also soda pop, pop, mineral water, and minerals.
        It has many variants. The sweetening agent may be natural,
        such as cane sugar or corn syrup, or artificial, such as
        saccharin or aspartame. The flavoring varies widely,
        popular variants being fruit or cola flavoring.
        [PJC]
  
     Caustic soda, sodium hydroxide.
  
     Cooking soda, sodium bicarbonate. [Colloq.]
  
     Sal soda. See Sodium carbonate, under Sodium.
  
     Soda alum (Min.), a mineral consisting of the hydrous
        sulphate of alumina and soda.
  
     Soda ash, crude sodium carbonate; -- so called because
        formerly obtained from the ashes of sea plants and certain
        other plants, as saltwort ({Salsola). See under Sodium.
        
  
     Soda fountain, an apparatus for drawing soda water, fitted
        with delivery tube, faucets, etc.
  
     Soda lye, a lye consisting essentially of a solution of
        sodium hydroxide, used in soap making.
  
     Soda niter. See Nitratine.
  
     Soda salts, salts having sodium for the base; specifically,
        sodium sulphate or Glauber's salts.
  
     Soda waste, the waste material, consisting chiefly of
        calcium hydroxide and sulphide, which accumulates as a
        useless residue or side product in the ordinary Leblanc
        process of soda manufacture; -- called also alkali
        waste.
  
     Washing soda, sodium carbonate. [Colloq.]
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Soda pop \So"da pop\, n.
     a popular non-alcoholic beverage, sweetened by various means,
     containing flavoring and supersaturated with carbon dioxide,
     so as to be effervescent when the container is opened; -- in
     different localities it is variously called also soda,
     pop, mineral water, and minerals. It has many variants.
     The sweetening agent may be natural, such as cane sugar or
     corn syrup, or artificial, such as saccharin or aspartame.
     The flavoring varies widely, popular variants being fruit
     juices, fruit sirups, cream, or cola flavoring; the soda pop
     is usually served chilled.
  
     Note: Several large corporations started primarily as
           bottlers of soda pop, such as Coca-Cola,
           Pepsi-Cola, and Dr. Pepper.
           [PJC]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Mineral \Min"er*al\, a.
     1. Of or pertaining to minerals; consisting of a mineral or
        of minerals; as, a mineral substance.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Impregnated with minerals; as, mineral waters.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Mineral acids (Chem.), inorganic acids, as sulphuric,
        nitric, phosphoric, hydrochloric, acids, etc., as
        distinguished from the organic acids.
  
     Mineral blue, the name usually given to azurite, when
        reduced to an impalpable powder for coloring purposes.
  
     Mineral candle, a candle made of paraffin.
  
     Mineral caoutchouc, an elastic mineral pitch, a variety of
        bitumen, resembling caoutchouc in elasticity and softness.
        See Caoutchouc, and Elaterite.
  
     Mineral chameleon (Chem.) See Chameleon mineral, under
        Chameleon.
  
     Mineral charcoal. See under Charcoal.
  
     Mineral cotton. See Mineral wool (below).
  
     Mineral green, a green carbonate of copper; malachite.
  
     Mineral kingdom (Nat. Sci.), that one of the three grand
        divisions of nature which embraces all inorganic objects,
        as distinguished from plants or animals.
  
     Mineral oil. See Naphtha, and Petroleum.
  
     Mineral paint, a pigment made chiefly of some natural
        mineral substance, as red or yellow iron ocher.
  
     Mineral patch. See Bitumen, and Asphalt.
  
     Mineral right, the right of taking minerals from land.
  
     Mineral salt (Chem.), a salt of a mineral acid.
  
     Mineral tallow, a familiar name for hatchettite, from its
        fatty or spermaceti-like appearance.
  
     Mineral water. See under Water.
  
     Mineral wax. See Ozocerite.
  
     Mineral wool, a fibrous wool-like material, made by blowing
        a powerful jet of air or steam through melted slag. It is
        a poor conductor of heat.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Water \Wa"ter\ (w[add]"t[~e]r), n. [AS. w[ae]ter; akin to OS.
     watar, OFries. wetir, weter, LG. & D. water, G. wasser, OHG.
     wazzar, Icel. vatn, Sw. vatten, Dan. vand, Goth. wat[=o], O.
     Slav. & Russ. voda, Gr. 'y`dwr, Skr. udan water, ud to wet,
     and perhaps to L. unda wave. [root]137. Cf. Dropsy,
     Hydra, Otter, Wet, Whisky.]
     1. The fluid which descends from the clouds in rain, and
        which forms rivers, lakes, seas, etc. "We will drink
        water." --Shak. "Powers of fire, air, water, and earth."
        --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Pure water consists of hydrogen and oxygen, H2O, and
           is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, transparent
           liquid, which is very slightly compressible. At its
           maximum density, 39[deg] Fahr. or 4[deg] C., it is the
           standard for specific gravities, one cubic centimeter
           weighing one gram. It freezes at 32[deg] Fahr. or
           0[deg] C. and boils at 212[deg] Fahr. or 100[deg] C.
           (see Ice, Steam). It is the most important natural
           solvent, and is frequently impregnated with foreign
           matter which is mostly removed by distillation; hence,
           rain water is nearly pure. It is an important
           ingredient in the tissue of animals and plants, the
           human body containing about two thirds its weight of
           water.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A body of water, standing or flowing; a lake, river, or
        other collection of water.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Remembering he had passed over a small water a poor
              scholar when first coming to the university, he
              kneeled.                              --Fuller.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Any liquid secretion, humor, or the like, resembling
        water; esp., the urine.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. (Pharm.) A solution in water of a gaseous or readily
        volatile substance; as, ammonia water. --U. S. Pharm.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. The limpidity and luster of a precious stone, especially a
        diamond; as, a diamond of the first water, that is,
        perfectly pure and transparent. Hence, of the first water,
        that is, of the first excellence.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. A wavy, lustrous pattern or decoration such as is imparted
        to linen, silk, metals, etc. See Water, v. t., 3,
        Damask, v. t., and Damaskeen.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     7. An addition to the shares representing the capital of a
        stock company so that the aggregate par value of the
        shares is increased while their value for investment is
        diminished, or "diluted." [Brokers' Cant]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Water is often used adjectively and in the formation of
           many self-explaining compounds; as, water drainage;
           water gauge, or water-gauge; waterfowl, water-fowl, or
           water fowl; water-beaten; water-borne, water-circled,
           water-girdled, water-rocked, etc.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     Hard water. See under Hard.
  
     Inch of water, a unit of measure of quantity of water,
        being the quantity which will flow through an orifice one
        inch square, or a circular orifice one inch in diameter,
        in a vertical surface, under a stated constant head; also
        called miner's inch, and water inch. The shape of the
        orifice and the head vary in different localities. In the
        Western United States, for hydraulic mining, the standard
        aperture is square and the head from 4 to 9 inches above
        its center. In Europe, for experimental hydraulics, the
        orifice is usually round and the head from 1/2 of an inch
        to 1 inch above its top.
  
     Mineral water, waters which are so impregnated with foreign
        ingredients, such as gaseous, sulphureous, and saline
        substances, as to give them medicinal properties, or a
        particular flavor or temperature.
  
     Soft water, water not impregnated with lime or mineral
        salts.
  
     To hold water. See under Hold, v. t.
  
     To keep one's head above water, to keep afloat; fig., to
        avoid failure or sinking in the struggles of life.
        [Colloq.]
  
     To make water.
        (a) To pass urine. --Swift.
        (b) (Naut.) To admit water; to leak.
  
     Water of crystallization (Chem.), the water combined with
        many salts in their crystalline form. This water is
        loosely, but, nevertheless, chemically, combined, for it
        is held in fixed and definite amount for each substance
        containing it. Thus, while pure copper sulphate, CuSO4,
        is a white amorphous substance, blue vitriol, the
        crystallized form, CuSO4.5H2O, contains five molecules
        of water of crystallization.
  
     Water on the brain (Med.), hydrocephalus.
  
     Water on the chest (Med.), hydrothorax.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Other phrases, in which water occurs as the first
           element, will be found in alphabetical order in the
           Vocabulary.
           [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  mineral water
      n 1: water naturally or artificially impregnated with mineral
           salts or gasses; often effervescent; often used
           therapeutically

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