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3 definitions found
 for Grunting ox
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Grunt \Grunt\ (gr[u^]nt), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Grunted; p. pr.
     & vb. n. Grunting.] [OE. grunten; akin to As. grunian, G.
     grunzen, Dan. grynte, Sw. grymta; all prob. of imitative; or
     perh. akin to E. groan.]
     To make a deep, short noise, as a hog; to utter a short groan
     or a deep guttural sound.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           Who would fardels bear,
           To grunt and sweat under a weary life.   --Shak.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Grunting ox (Zool.), the yak.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Ox \Ox\ ([o^]ks), n.; pl. Oxen. [AS. oxa; akin to D. os. G.
     ochs, ochse, OHG. ohso, Icel. oxi, Sw. & Dan. oxe, Goth.
     a['u]hsa, Skr. ukshan ox, bull; cf. Skr. uksh to sprinkle.
     [root]214. Cf. Humid, Aurochs.] (Zool.)
     The male of bovine quadrupeds, especially the domestic animal
     when castrated and grown to its full size, or nearly so. The
     word is also applied, as a general name, to any species of
     bovine animals, male and female.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field.
                                                    --Ps. viii. 7.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: The castrated male is called a steer until it attains
           its full growth, and then, an ox; but if castrated
           somewhat late in life, it is called a stag. The male,
           not castrated, is called a bull. These distinctions are
           well established in regard to domestic animals of this
           genus. When wild animals of this kind are spoken of, ox
           is often applied both to the male and the female. The
           name ox is never applied to the individual cow, or
           female, of the domestic kind. Oxen may comprehend both
           the male and the female.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     Grunting ox (Zool.), the yak.
  
     Indian ox (Zool.), the zebu.
  
     Javan ox (Zool.), the banteng.
  
     Musk ox. (Zool.) See under Musk.
  
     Ox bile. See Ox gall, below.
  
     Ox gall, the fresh gall of the domestic ox; -- used in the
        arts and in medicine.
  
     Ox pith, ox marrow. [Obs.] --Marston.
  
     Ox+ray+(Zool.),+a+very+large+ray+({Dicerobatis+Giornae">Ox ray (Zool.), a very large ray ({Dicerobatis Giornae) of
        Southern Europe. It has a hornlike organ projecting
        forward from each pectoral fin. It sometimes becomes
        twenty feet long and twenty-eight feet broad, and weighs
        over a ton. Called also sea devil.
  
     To have the black ox tread on one's foot, to be
        unfortunate; to know what sorrow is (because black oxen
        were sacrificed to Pluto). --Leigh Hunt.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Yak \Yak\ (y[a^]k), n. [Tibetan gyag.] (Zool.)
     A bovine mammal ({Poephagus grunnies) native of the high
     plains of Central Asia. Its neck, the outer side of its legs,
     and its flanks, are covered with long, flowing, fine hair.
     Its tail is long and bushy, often white, and is valued as an
     ornament and for other purposes in India and China. There are
     several domesticated varieties, some of which lack the mane
     and the long hair on the flanks. Called also chauri gua,
     grunting cow, grunting ox, sarlac, sarlik, and
     sarluc.
     [1913 Webster]
  
     Yak lace, a coarse pillow lace made from the silky hair of
        the yak.
        [1913 Webster]

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