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2 definitions found
 for Flew
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Flew \Flew\,
     imp. of Fly.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Fly \Fly\ (fl[imac]), v. i. [imp. Flew (fl[=u]); p. p. Flown
     (fl[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. Flying.] [OE. fleen, fleen,
     fleyen, flegen, AS. fle['o]gan; akin to D. vliegen, OHG.
     fliogan, G. fliegen, Icel. flj[=u]ga, Sw. flyga, Dan. flyve,
     Goth. us-flaugjan to cause to fly away, blow about, and perh.
     to L. pluma feather, E. plume. [root]84. Cf. Fledge,
     Flight, Flock of animals.]
     1. To move in or pass through the air with wings, as a bird.
  
     2. To move through the air or before the wind; esp., to pass
        or be driven rapidly through the air by any impulse.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. To float, wave, or rise in the air, as sparks or a flag.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Man is born unto trouble, as the sparks fly upward.
                                                    --Job v. 7.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. To move or pass swiftly; to hasten away; to circulate
        rapidly; as, a ship flies on the deep; a top flies around;
        rumor flies.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Fly, envious Time, till thou run out thy race.
                                                    --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The dark waves murmured as the ships flew on.
                                                    --Bryant.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. To run from danger; to attempt to escape; to flee; as, an
        enemy or a coward flies. See Note under Flee.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Fly, ere evil intercept thy flight.   --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Whither shall I fly to escape their hands ? --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. To move suddenly, or with violence; to do an act suddenly
        or swiftly; -- usually with a qualifying word; as, a door
        flies open; a bomb flies apart.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     To fly about (Naut.), to change frequently in a short time;
        -- said of the wind.
  
     To fly around, to move about in haste. [Colloq.]
  
     To fly at, to spring toward; to rush on; to attack
        suddenly.
  
     To fly in the face of, to insult; to assail; to set at
        defiance; to oppose with violence; to act in direct
        opposition to; to resist.
  
     To fly off, to separate, or become detached suddenly; to
        revolt.
  
     To fly on, to attack.
  
     To fly open, to open suddenly, or with violence.
  
     To fly out.
        (a) To rush out.
        (b) To burst into a passion; to break out into license.
  
     To let fly.
        (a) To throw or drive with violence; to discharge. "A man
            lets fly his arrow without taking any aim." --Addison.
        (b) (Naut.) To let go suddenly and entirely; as, to let
            fly the sheets.
            [1913 Webster]

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