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5 definitions found
 for Electric current
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Electric \E*lec"tric\ ([-e]*l[e^]k"tr[i^]k), Electrical
  \E*lec"tric*al\ ([-e]*l[e^]k"tr[i^]*kal), a. [L. electrum amber,
     a mixed metal, Gr. 'h`lektron; akin to 'hle`ktwr the beaming
     sun, cf. Skr. arc to beam, shine: cf. F. ['e]lectrique. The
     name came from the production of electricity by the friction
     of amber.]
     1. Pertaining to electricity; consisting of, containing,
        derived from, or produced by, electricity; as, electric
        power or virtue; an electric jar; electric effects; an
        electric spark; an electric charge; an electric current;
        an electrical engineer.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Capable of occasioning the phenomena of electricity; as,
        an electric or electrical machine or substance; an
        electric generator.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Electrifying; thrilling; magnetic. "Electric Pindar."
        --Mrs. Browning.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. powered by electricity; as, electrical appliances; an
        electric toothbrush; an electric automobile.
        [WordNet 1.5]
  
     Electric atmosphere, or Electric aura. See under Aura.
        
  
     Electrical battery. See Battery.
  
     Electrical brush. See under Brush.
  
     Electric cable. See Telegraph cable, under Telegraph.
        
  
     Electric candle. See under Candle.
  
     Electric cat (Zo["o]l.), one of three or more large species
        of African catfish of the genus Malapterurus (esp. M.
        electricus of the Nile). They have a large electrical
        organ and are able to give powerful shocks; -- called also
        sheathfish.
  
     Electric clock. See under Clock, and see
        Electro-chronograph.
  
     Electric current, a current or stream of electricity
        traversing a closed circuit formed of conducting
        substances, or passing by means of conductors from one
        body to another which is in a different electrical state.
        
  
     Electric eel, or Electrical eel (Zo["o]l.), a South
        American eel-like fresh-water fish of the genus Gymnotus
        ({G. electricus), from two to five feet in length,
        capable of giving a violent electric shock. See
        Gymnotus.
  
     Electrical fish (Zo["o]l.), any fish which has an
        electrical organ by means of which it can give an
        electrical shock. The best known kinds are the torpedo,
        the gymnotus, or electrical eel, and the electric
        cat. See Torpedo, and Gymnotus.
  
     Electric fluid, the supposed matter of electricity;
        lightning. [archaic]
  
     Electrical image (Elec.), a collection of electrical points
        regarded as forming, by an analogy with optical phenomena,
        an image of certain other electrical points, and used in
        the solution of electrical problems. --Sir W. Thomson.
  
     Electric machine, or Electrical machine, an apparatus for
        generating, collecting, or exciting, electricity, as by
        friction.
  
     Electric motor. See Electro-motor, 2.
  
     Electric osmose. (Physics) See under Osmose.
  
     Electric pen, a hand pen for making perforated stencils for
        multiplying writings. It has a puncturing needle driven at
        great speed by a very small magneto-electric engine on the
        penhandle.
  
     Electric railway, a railway in which the machinery for
        moving the cars is driven by an electric current.
  
     Electric ray (Zo["o]l.), the torpedo.
  
     Electric telegraph. See Telegraph.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Electricity \E`lec*tric"i*ty\ ([=e]`l[e^]k*tr[i^]s"[i^]*t[y^]),
     n.; pl. Electricities ([=e]`l[e^]k*tr[i^]s"[i^]*t[i^]z).
     [Cf. F. ['e]lectricit['e]. See Electric.]
     1. (Physics) a property of certain of the fundamental
        particles of which matter is composed, called also
        electric charge, and being of two types, designated
        positive and negative; the property of electric charge on
        a particle or physical body creates a force field which
        affects other particles or bodies possessing electric
        charge; positive charges create a repulsive force between
        them, and negative charges also create a repulsive force.
        A positively charged body and a negatively charged body
        will create an attractive force between them. The unit of
        electrical charge is the coulomb, and the intensity of
        the force field at any point is measured in volts.
        [PJC]
  
     2. any of several phenomena associated with the accumulation
        or movement of electrically charged particles within
        material bodies, classified as static electricity and
        electric current. Static electricity is often observed
        in everyday life, when it causes certain materials to
        cling together; when sufficient static charge is
        accumulated, an electric current may pass through the air
        between two charged bodies, and is observed as a visible
        spark; when the spark passes from a human body to another
        object it may be felt as a mild to strong painful
        sensation. Electricity in the form of electric current is
        put to many practical uses in electrical and electronic
        devices. Lightning is also known to be a form of electric
        current passing between clouds and the ground, or between
        two clouds. Electric currents may produce heat, light,
        concussion, and often chemical changes when passed between
        objects or through any imperfectly conducting substance or
        space. Accumulation of electrical charge or generation of
        a voltage differnce between two parts of a complex object
        may be caused by any of a variety of disturbances of
        molecular equilibrium, whether from a chemical, physical,
        or mechanical, cause. Electric current in metals and most
        other solid coductors is carried by the movement of
        electrons from one part of the metal to another. In ionic
        solutions and in semiconductors, other types of movement
        of charged particles may be responsible for the observed
        electrical current.
        [PJC]
  
     Note: Electricity is manifested under following different
           forms: (a)
  
     Statical electricity, called also
  
     Frictional electricity or Common electricity, electricity
        in the condition of a stationary charge, in which the
        disturbance is produced by friction, as of glass, amber,
        etc., or by induction. (b)
  
     Dynamical electricity, called also
  
     Voltaic electricity, electricity in motion, or as a current
        produced by chemical decomposition, as by means of a
        voltaic battery, or by mechanical action, as by
        dynamo-electric machines. (c)
  
     Thermoelectricity, in which the disturbing cause is heat
        (attended possibly with some chemical action). It is
        developed by uniting two pieces of unlike metals in a bar,
        and then heating the bar unequally. (d)
  
     Atmospheric electricity, any condition of electrical
        disturbance in the atmosphere or clouds, due to some or
        all of the above mentioned causes. (e)
  
     Magnetic electricity, electricity developed by the action
        of magnets. (f)
  
     Positive electricity, the electricity that appears at the
        positive pole or anode of a battery, or that is produced
        by friction of glass; -- called also vitreous
        electricity. (g)
  
     Negative electricity, the electricity that appears at the
        negative pole or cathode, or is produced by the friction
        of resinous substance; -- called also resinous
        electricity. (h)
  
     Organic electricity, that which is developed in organic
        structures, either animal or vegetable, the phrase animal
        electricity being much more common.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. The science which studies the phenomena and laws of
        electricity; electrical science.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. Fig.: excitement, anticipation, or emotional tension,
        usually caused by the occurrence or expectation of
        something unusual or important.

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  electric current \electric current\, electrical current
  \electrical current\,
     the movement of electrically charged particles, atoms, or
     ions, through solids, liquids, gases, or free space; the term
     is usually used of relatively smooth movements of electric
     charge through conductors, whether constant or variable.
     Sudden movements of charge are usually referred to by other
     terms, such as spark or lightning or discharge. In
     metallic conductors the electric current is usually due to
     movement of electrons through the metal. The current is
     measured as the rate of movement of charge per unit time, and
     is counted in units of amperes. As a formal definition, the
     direction of movement of electric current is considered as
     the same as the direction of movement of positive charge, or
     in a direction opposite to the movement of negative charge.
     Electric current may move constantly in a single direction,
     called direct current (abbreviated DC), or may move
     alternately in one direction and then the opposite direction,
     called alternating current (abbreviated AC).
     [PJC]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  electric current
      n 1: a flow of electricity through a conductor; "the current was
           measured in amperes" [syn: current, electric current]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  47 Moby Thesaurus words for "electric current":
     AC, DC, absorption current, active current, alternating current,
     base current, cathode current, collector current,
     conduction current, convection current, cycle, delta current,
     dielectric displacement current, direct current,
     displacement current, eddy current, electric stream,
     electron cloud, electron flow, electron gas, electron stream,
     emission current, exciting current, free alternating current,
     galvanic current, high-frequency current, idle current,
     induced current, induction current, ionization current, juice,
     low-frequency current, magnetizing current, multiphase current,
     output current, plate current, pulsating direct current,
     reactive current, rotary current, single-phase alternating current,
     space charge, stray current, thermionic current,
     thermoelectric current, three-phase alternating current,
     voltaic current, watt current
  
  

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