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4 definitions found
 for Busk
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Busk \Busk\ (b[u^]sk), n. [F. busc, perh. fr. the hypothetical
     older form of E. bois wood, because the first busks were made
     of wood. See Bush, and cf. OF. busche, F. b[^u]che, a piece
     or log of wood, fr. the same root.]
     A thin, elastic strip of metal, whalebone, wood, or other
     material, worn in the front of a corset.
     [1913 Webster]
  
           Her long slit sleeves, stiff busk, puff verdingall,
           Is all that makes her thus angelical.    --Marston.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Busk \Busk\ (b[u^]sk), n.
     Among the Creek Indians, a feast of first fruits celebrated
     when the corn is ripe enough to be eaten. The feast usually
     continues four days. On the first day the new fire is
     lighted, by friction of wood, and distributed to the various
     households, an offering of green corn, including an ear
     brought from each of the four quarters or directions, is
     consumed, and medicine is brewed from snakeroot. On the
     second and third days the men physic with the medicine, the
     women bathe, the two sexes are taboo to one another, and all
     fast. On the fourth day there are feasting, dancing, and
     games.
     [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Busk \Busk\, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Busked (b[u^]skt).] [OE.
     busken, fr. Icel. b[=u]ask to make one's self ready,
     rexlexive of b[=u]a to prepare, dwell. Cf. 8th Bound.]
     1. To prepare; to make ready; to array; to dress. [Scot. &
        Old Eng.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Busk you, busk you, my bonny, bonny bride.
                                                    --Hamilton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. To go; to direct one's course. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Ye might have busked you to Huntly banks. --Skelton.
        [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  busk
      v 1: play music in a public place and solicit money for it;
           "three young men were busking in the plaza"

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