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3 definitions found
 for Black horse
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Horse \Horse\ (h[^o]rs), n. [AS. hors; akin to OS. hros, D. &
     OHG. ros, G. ross, Icel. hross; and perh. to L. currere to
     run, E. course, current Cf. Walrus.]
     1. (Zool.) A hoofed quadruped of the genus Equus;
        especially, the domestic horse ({Equus caballus), which
        was domesticated in Egypt and Asia at a very early period.
        It has six broad molars, on each side of each jaw, with
        six incisors, and two canine teeth, both above and below.
        The mares usually have the canine teeth rudimentary or
        wanting. The horse differs from the true asses, in having
        a long, flowing mane, and the tail bushy to the base.
        Unlike the asses it has callosities, or chestnuts, on all
        its legs. The horse excels in strength, speed, docility,
        courage, and nobleness of character, and is used for
        drawing, carrying, bearing a rider, and like purposes.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Many varieties, differing in form, size, color, gait,
           speed, etc., are known, but all are believed to have
           been derived from the same original species. It is
           supposed to have been a native of the plains of Central
           Asia, but the wild species from which it was derived is
           not certainly known. The feral horses of America are
           domestic horses that have run wild; and it is probably
           true that most of those of Asia have a similar origin.
           Some of the true wild Asiatic horses do, however,
           approach the domestic horse in several characteristics.
           Several species of fossil ({Equus) are known from the
           later Tertiary formations of Europe and America. The
           fossil species of other genera of the family
           Equid[ae] are also often called horses, in general
           sense.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     2. The male of the genus Equus, in distinction from the
        female or male; usually, a castrated male.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Mounted soldiery; cavalry; -- used without the plural
        termination; as, a regiment of horse; -- distinguished
        from foot.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              The armies were appointed, consisting of twenty-five
              thousand horse and foot.              --Bacon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. A frame with legs, used to support something; as, a
        clotheshorse, a sawhorse, etc.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. A frame of timber, shaped like a horse, on which soldiers
        were made to ride for punishment.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. Anything, actual or figurative, on which one rides as on a
        horse; a hobby.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     7. (Mining) A mass of earthy matter, or rock of the same
        character as the wall rock, occurring in the course of a
        vein, as of coal or ore; hence, to take horse -- said of a
        vein -- is to divide into branches for a distance.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     8. (Naut.)
        (a) See Footrope, a.
        (b) A breastband for a leadsman.
        (c) An iron bar for a sheet traveler to slide upon.
        (d) A jackstay. --W. C. Russell. --Totten.
            [1913 Webster]
  
     9. (Student Slang)
        (a) A translation or other illegitimate aid in study or
            examination; -- called also trot, pony, Dobbin.
        (b) Horseplay; tomfoolery.
            [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
  
     10. heroin. [slang]
         [PJC]
  
     11. horsepower. [Colloq. contraction]
         [PJC]
  
     Note: Horse is much used adjectively and in composition to
           signify of, or having to do with, a horse or horses,
           like a horse, etc.; as, horse collar, horse dealer or
           horse?dealer, horsehoe, horse jockey; and hence, often
           in the sense of strong, loud, coarse, etc.; as,
           horselaugh, horse nettle or horse-nettle, horseplay,
           horse ant, etc.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     Black horse, Blood horse, etc. See under Black, etc.
  
     Horse aloes, caballine aloes.
  
     Horse+ant+(Zool.),+a+large+ant+({Formica+rufa">Horse ant (Zool.), a large ant ({Formica rufa); -- called
        also horse emmet.
  
     Horse artillery, that portion of the artillery in which the
        cannoneers are mounted, and which usually serves with the
        cavalry; flying artillery.
  
     Horse balm (Bot.), a strong-scented labiate plant
        ({Collinsonia Canadensis), having large leaves and
        yellowish flowers.
  
     Horse bean (Bot.), a variety of the English or Windsor bean
        ({Faba vulgaris), grown for feeding horses.
  
     Horse boat, a boat for conveying horses and cattle, or a
        boat propelled by horses.
  
     Horse bot. (Zool.) See Botfly, and Bots.
  
     Horse box, a railroad car for transporting valuable horses,
        as hunters. [Eng.]
  
     Horse breaker or Horse trainer, one employed in subduing
        or training horses for use.
  
     Horse car.
         (a) A railroad car drawn by horses. See under Car.
         (b) A car fitted for transporting horses.
  
     Horse cassia (Bot.), a leguminous plant ({Cassia
        Javanica), bearing long pods, which contain a black,
        catharic pulp, much used in the East Indies as a horse
        medicine.
  
     Horse cloth, a cloth to cover a horse.
  
     Horse conch (Zool.), a large, spiral, marine shell of the
        genus Triton. See Triton.
  
     Horse courser.
         (a) One that runs horses, or keeps horses for racing.
             --Johnson.
         (b) A dealer in horses. [Obs.] --Wiseman.
  
     Horse crab (Zool.), the Limulus; -- called also
        horsefoot, horsehoe crab, and king crab.
  
     Horse crevall['e] (Zool.), the cavally.
  
     Horse emmet (Zool.), the horse ant.
  
     Horse finch (Zool.), the chaffinch. [Prov. Eng.]
  
     Horse gentian (Bot.), fever root.
  
     Horse iron (Naut.), a large calking iron.
  
     Horse latitudes, a space in the North Atlantic famous for
        calms and baffling winds, being between the westerly winds
        of higher latitudes and the trade winds. --Ham. Nav.
        Encyc.
  
     Horse mackrel. (Zool.)
         (a) The common tunny ({Orcynus thunnus), found on the
             Atlantic coast of Europe and America, and in the
             Mediterranean.
         (b) The bluefish ({Pomatomus saltatrix).
         (c) The scad.
         (d) The name is locally applied to various other fishes,
             as the California hake, the black candlefish, the
             jurel, the bluefish, etc.
  
     Horse marine (Naut.), an awkward, lubbery person; one of a
        mythical body of marine cavalry. [Slang]
  
     Horse mussel (Zool.), a large, marine mussel ({Modiola
        modiolus), found on the northern shores of Europe and
        America.
  
     Horse nettle (Bot.), a coarse, prickly, American herb, the
        Solanum Carolinense.
  
     Horse parsley. (Bot.) See Alexanders.
  
     Horse purslain (Bot.), a coarse fleshy weed of tropical
        America ({Trianthema monogymnum).
  
     Horse race, a race by horses; a match of horses in running
        or trotting.
  
     Horse racing, the practice of racing with horses.
  
     Horse railroad, a railroad on which the cars are drawn by
        horses; -- in England, and sometimes in the United States,
        called a tramway.
  
     Horse run (Civil Engin.), a device for drawing loaded
        wheelbarrows up an inclined plane by horse power.
  
     Horse sense, strong common sense. [Colloq. U.S.]
  
     Horse soldier, a cavalryman.
  
     Horse sponge (Zool.), a large, coarse, commercial sponge
        ({Spongia equina).
  
     Horse stinger (Zool.), a large dragon fly. [Prov. Eng.]
  
     Horse sugar (Bot.), a shrub of the southern part of the
        United States ({Symplocos tinctoria), whose leaves are
        sweet, and good for fodder.
  
     Horse tick (Zool.), a winged, dipterous insect ({Hippobosca
        equina), which troubles horses by biting them, and
        sucking their blood; -- called also horsefly, horse
        louse, and forest fly.
  
     Horse vetch (Bot.), a plant of the genus Hippocrepis
        ({Hippocrepis comosa), cultivated for the beauty of its
        flowers; -- called also horsehoe vetch, from the
        peculiar shape of its pods.
  
     Iron horse, a locomotive. [Colloq.]
  
     Salt horse, the sailor's name for salt beef.
  
     To look a gift horse in the mouth, to examine the mouth of
        a horse which has been received as a gift, in order to
        ascertain his age; -- hence, to accept favors in a
        critical and thankless spirit. --Lowell.
  
     To take horse.
         (a) To set out on horseback. --Macaulay.
         (b) To be covered, as a mare.
         (c) See definition 7 (above).
             [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Sucker \Suck"er\ (s[u^]k"[~e]r), n.
     1. One who, or that which, sucks; esp., one of the organs by
        which certain animals, as the octopus and remora, adhere
        to other bodies.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. A suckling; a sucking animal. --Beau. & Fl.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. The embolus, or bucket, of a pump; also, the valve of a
        pump basket. --Boyle.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. A pipe through which anything is drawn.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. A small piece of leather, usually round, having a string
        attached to the center, which, when saturated with water
        and pressed upon a stone or other body having a smooth
        surface, adheres, by reason of the atmospheric pressure,
        with such force as to enable a considerable weight to be
        thus lifted by the string; -- used by children as a
        plaything.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. (Bot.) A shoot from the roots or lower part of the stem of
        a plant; -- so called, perhaps, from diverting nourishment
        from the body of the plant.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     7. (Zool.)
        (a) Any one of numerous species of North American
            fresh-water cyprinoid fishes of the family
            Catostomidae; so called because the lips are
            protrusile. The flesh is coarse, and they are of
            little value as food. The most common species of the
            Eastern United States are the northern sucker
            ({Catostomus Commersoni), the white sucker
            ({Catostomus teres), the hog sucker ({Catostomus
            nigricans), and the chub, or sweet sucker ({Erimyzon
            sucetta). Some of the large Western species are
            called buffalo fish, red horse, black horse, and
            suckerel.
        (b) The remora.
        (c) The lumpfish.
        (d) The hagfish, or myxine.
        (e) A California food fish ({Menticirrus undulatus)
            closely allied to the kingfish
        (a); -- called also bagre.
            [1913 Webster]
  
     8. A parasite; a sponger. See def. 6, above.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              They who constantly converse with men far above
              their estates shall reap shame and loss thereby; if
              thou payest nothing, they will count thee a sucker,
              no branch.                            --Fuller.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     9. A hard drinker; a soaker. [Slang]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     10. A greenhorn; someone easily cheated, gulled, or deceived.
         [Slang, U.S.]
         [1913 Webster]
  
     11. A nickname applied to a native of Illinois. [U. S.]
         [1913 Webster]
  
     12. A person strongly attracted to something; -- usually used
         with for; as, he's a sucker for tall blondes.
         [PJC]
  
     11. Any thing or person; -- usually implying annoyance or
         dislike; as, I went to change the blade and cut my finger
         on the sucker. [Slang]
         [PJC]
  
     Carp sucker, Cherry sucker, etc. See under Carp,
        Cherry, etc.
  
     Sucker fish. See Sucking fish, under Sucking.
  
     Sucker rod, a pump rod. See under Pump.
  
     Sucker tube (Zool.), one of the external ambulacral tubes
        of an echinoderm, -- usually terminated by a sucker and
        used for locomotion. Called also sucker foot. See
        Spatangoid.
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Black \Black\ (bl[a^]k), a. [OE. blak, AS. bl[ae]c; akin to
     Icel. blakkr dark, swarthy, Sw. bl[aum]ck ink, Dan. bl[ae]k,
     OHG. blach, LG. & D. blaken to burn with a black smoke. Not
     akin to AS. bl[=a]c, E. bleak pallid. [root]98.]
     1. Destitute of light, or incapable of reflecting it; of the
        color of soot or coal; of the darkest or a very dark
        color, the opposite of white; characterized by such a
        color; as, black cloth; black hair or eyes.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              O night, with hue so black!           --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. In a less literal sense: Enveloped or shrouded in
        darkness; very dark or gloomy; as, a black night; the
        heavens black with clouds.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              I spy a black, suspicious, threatening cloud.
                                                    --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Fig.: Dismal, gloomy, or forbidding, like darkness;
        destitute of moral light or goodness; atrociously wicked;
        cruel; mournful; calamitous; horrible. "This day's black
        fate." "Black villainy." "Arise, black vengeance." "Black
        day." "Black despair." --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. Expressing menace, or discontent; threatening; sullen;
        foreboding; as, to regard one with black looks.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Black is often used in self-explaining compound words;
           as, black-eyed, black-faced, black-haired,
           black-visaged.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     Black act, the English statute 9 George I, which makes it a
        felony to appear armed in any park or warren, etc., or to
        hunt or steal deer, etc., with the face blackened or
        disguised. Subsequent acts inflicting heavy penalties for
        malicious injuries to cattle and machinery have been
        called black acts.
  
     Black angel (Zool.), a fish of the West Indies and Florida
        ({Holacanthus tricolor), with the head and tail yellow,
        and the middle of the body black.
  
     Black antimony (Chem.), the black sulphide of antimony,
        Sb2S3, used in pyrotechnics, etc.
  
     Black bear (Zool.), the common American bear ({Ursus
        Americanus).
  
     Black beast. See B[^e]te noire.
  
     Black beetle (Zool.), the common large cockroach ({Blatta
        orientalis).
  
     Black bonnet (Zool.), the black-headed bunting ({Embriza
        Sch[oe]niclus) of Europe.
  
     Black canker, a disease in turnips and other crops,
        produced by a species of caterpillar.
  
     Black cat (Zool.), the fisher, a quadruped of North America
        allied to the sable, but larger. See Fisher.
  
     Black cattle, any bovine cattle reared for slaughter, in
        distinction from dairy cattle. [Eng.]
  
     Black cherry. See under Cherry.
  
     Black cockatoo (Zool.), the palm cockatoo. See Cockatoo.
        
  
     Black copper. Same as Melaconite.
  
     Black currant. (Bot.) See Currant.
  
     Black diamond. (Min.) See Carbonado.
  
     Black draught (Med.), a cathartic medicine, composed of
        senna and magnesia.
  
     Black drop (Med.), vinegar of opium; a narcotic preparation
        consisting essentially of a solution of opium in vinegar.
        
  
     Black earth, mold; earth of a dark color. --Woodward.
  
     Black flag, the flag of a pirate, often bearing in white a
        skull and crossbones; a signal of defiance.
  
     Black+flea+(Zool.),+a+flea+beetle+({Haltica+nemorum">Black flea (Zool.), a flea beetle ({Haltica nemorum)
        injurious to turnips.
  
     Black flux, a mixture of carbonate of potash and charcoal,
        obtained by deflagrating tartar with half its weight of
        niter. --Brande & C.
  
     Black Forest [a translation of G. Schwarzwald], a forest in
        Baden and W["u]rtemburg, in Germany; a part of the ancient
        Hercynian forest.
  
     Black game, or Black grouse. (Zool.) See Blackcock,
        Grouse, and Heath grouse.
  
     Black grass (Bot.), a grasslike rush of the species Juncus
        Gerardi, growing on salt marshes, and making good hay.
  
     Black gum (Bot.), an American tree, the tupelo or
        pepperidge. See Tupelo.
  
     Black Hamburg (grape) (Bot.), a sweet and juicy variety of
        dark purple or "black" grape.
  
     Black horse (Zool.), a fish of the Mississippi valley
        ({Cycleptus elongatus), of the sucker family; the
        Missouri sucker.
  
     Black lemur (Zool.), the Lemurniger of Madagascar; the
        acoumbo of the natives.
  
     Black list, a list of persons who are for some reason
        thought deserving of censure or punishment; -- esp. a list
        of persons stigmatized as insolvent or untrustworthy, made
        for the protection of tradesmen or employers. See
        Blacklist, v. t.
  
     Black manganese (Chem.), the black oxide of manganese,
        MnO2.
  
     Black Maria, the close wagon in which prisoners are carried
        to or from jail.
  
     Black martin (Zool.), the chimney swift. See Swift.
  
     Black moss (Bot.), the common so-called long moss of the
        southern United States. See Tillandsia.
  
     Black oak. See under Oak.
  
     Black ocher. See Wad.
  
     Black pigment, a very fine, light carbonaceous substance,
        or lampblack, prepared chiefly for the manufacture of
        printers' ink. It is obtained by burning common coal tar.
        
  
     Black plate, sheet iron before it is tinned. --Knight.
  
     Black quarter, malignant anthrax with engorgement of a
        shoulder or quarter, etc., as of an ox.
  
     Black rat (Zool.), one of the species of rats ({Mus
        rattus), commonly infesting houses.
  
     Black rent. See Blackmail, n., 3.
  
     Black rust, a disease of wheat, in which a black, moist
        matter is deposited in the fissures of the grain.
  
     Black sheep, one in a family or company who is unlike the
        rest, and makes trouble.
  
     Black silver. (Min.) See under Silver.
  
     Black and tan, black mixed or spotted with tan color or
        reddish brown; -- used in describing certain breeds of
        dogs.
  
     Black tea. See under Tea.
  
     Black tin (Mining), tin ore (cassiterite), when dressed,
        stamped and washed, ready for smelting. It is in the form
        of a black powder, like fine sand. --Knight.
  
     Black walnut. See under Walnut.
  
     Black+warrior+(Zool.),+an+American+hawk+({Buteo+Harlani">Black warrior (Zool.), an American hawk ({Buteo Harlani).
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Dark; murky; pitchy; inky; somber; dusky; gloomy; swart;
          Cimmerian; ebon; atrocious.
          [1913 Webster]

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