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5 definitions found
 for Awk
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Awk \Awk\ ([add]k), a. [OE. auk, awk (properly) turned away;
     (hence) contrary, wrong, from Icel. ["o]figr, ["o]fugr,
     afigr, turning the wrong way, fr. af off, away; cf. OHG.
     abuh, Skr. ap[=a]c turned away, fr. apa off, away + a root
     ak, a[u^]k, to bend, from which come also E. angle, anchor.]
     [1913 Webster]
     1. Odd; out of order; perverse. [Obs.]
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Wrong, or not commonly used; clumsy; sinister; as, the awk
        end of a rod (the but end). [Obs.] --Golding.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Clumsy in performance or manners; unhandy; not dexterous;
        awkward. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Awk \Awk\, adv.
     Perversely; in the wrong way. --L'Estrange.
     [1913 Webster]

From V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (February 2016) :

  AWK
         al Aho, peter Weinberger, brian Kernighan (Unix)
         

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  awk
   /awk/
  
      1. n. [Unix techspeak] An interpreted language for massaging text data
      developed by Alfred Aho, Peter Weinberger, and Brian Kernighan (the name
      derives from their initials). It is characterized by C-like syntax, a
      declaration-free approach to variable typing and declarations, associative
      arrays, and field-oriented text processing. See also Perl.
  
      2. n. Editing term for an expression awkward to manipulate through normal {
      regexp facilities (for example, one containing a newline).
  
      3. vt. To process data using awk(1).
  
      B
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (30 December 2018) :

  awk
  
     1.  (Named from the authors' initials) An
     interpreted language included with many versions of Unix for
     massaging text data, developed by Alfred Aho, Peter Weinberger,
     and Brian Kernighan in 1978.  It is characterised by C-like
     syntax, declaration-free variables, associative arrays, and
     field-oriented text processing.
  
     There is a GNU version called gawk and other varients
     including bawk, mawk, nawk, tawk.  Perl was inspired
     in part by awk but is much more powerful.
  
     Unix manual page: awk(1).
  
     netlib WWW
     http://plan9.att.com/netlib/research/index.html)">(http://plan9.att.com/netlib/research/index.html).  netlib
     ftp://netlib.att.com/netlib/research/)">FTP (ftp://netlib.att.com/netlib/research/).
  
     ["The AWK Programming Language" A. Aho, B. Kernighan,
     P. Weinberger, A-W 1988].
  
     2.  An expression which is awkward to manipulate
     through normal regexp facilities, for example, one
     containing a newline.
  
     [{Jargon File]
  
     (1995-10-06)
  

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