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4 definitions found
 for highly
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Highly \High"ly\, adv.
     In a high manner, or to a high degree; very much; as, highly
     esteemed.
     [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  highly
      adv 1: to a high degree or extent; favorably or with much
             respect; "highly successful"; "He spoke highly of her";
             "does not think highly of his writing"; "extremely
             interesting" [syn: highly, extremely]
      2: at a high rate or wage; "highly paid workers"
      3: in a high position or level or rank; "details known by only a
         few highly placed persons"

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  54 Moby Thesaurus words for "highly":
     a deal, a great deal, a lot, abundantly, approvingly,
     as all creation, as all get-out, authoritatively, beaucoup,
     considerable, considerably, decidedly, effectively,
     enthusiastically, ever so, ever so much, exceedingly,
     exceptionally, extraordinarily, extremely, favorably, galore,
     greatly, hugely, immensely, importantly, in great measure,
     incomparably, influentially, largely, much, muchly, never so,
     no end, no end of, not a little, notably, parlous, plenty,
     powerfully, pretty much, quite, remarkably, so, so very much,
     strikingly, strongly, surpassingly, to the skies, tremendously,
     very, very much, warmly, well
  
  

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  highly
   adv.
  
      [scientific computation] The preferred modifier for overstating an
      understatement. As in: highly nonoptimal, the worst possible way to do
      something; highly nontrivial, either impossible or requiring a major
      research project; highly nonlinear, completely erratic and unpredictable;
      highly nontechnical, drivel written for lusers, oversimplified to the
      point of being misleading or incorrect (compare drool-proof paper). In
      other computing cultures, postfixing of in the extreme might be
      preferred.
  

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