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8 definitions found
 for dink
From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Dink \Dink\, a. [Etymol. uncertain.]
     Trim; neat. [Scot.] --Burns. -- Dink"ly, adv.
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  dink \dink\, v. t.
     To deck; -- often with out or up. [Scot.]
     [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  dink \dink\, n. [ca. 1985, acronym from double income no kids.]
     either of a married couple who both are employed and have no
     children. The term is often used as the prototype of
     midde-class persons with higher-than-average disposable
     income.
     [PJC]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  dink \dink\, n. (Tennis)
     a ball hit softly that falls to the ground just beyond the
     net.
     [PJC]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  dink \dink\, n.
     an Asian person, especially a Vietnamese; -- used
     contemptuously, considered disparaging and offensive. [U.S.
     slang]
  
     Syn: slant, slope. [PJC]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) :

  DINK
      n 1: a couple who both have careers and no children (an acronym
           for dual income no kids)
      2: a soft return so that the tennis ball drops abruptly after
         crossing the net [syn: drop shot, dink]

From The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003) :

  dink
   /dink/, adj.
  
      Said of a machine that has the bitty box nature; a machine too small to
      be worth bothering with ? sometimes the system you're currently forced to
      work on. First heard from an MIT hacker working on a CP/M system with 64K,
      in reference to any 6502 system, then from fans of 32-bit architectures
      about 16-bit machines. ?GNUMACS will never work on that dink machine.?
      Probably derived from mainstream ?dinky?, which isn't sufficiently
      pejorative. See macdink.
  

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (30 December 2018) :

  dink
  
     /dink/ Said of a machine that has the bitty box nature; a
     machine too small to be worth bothering with - sometimes the
     system you're currently forced to work on.  First heard from
     an MIT hacker working on a CP/M system with 64K, in
     reference to any 6502 system, then from fans of 32 bit
     architectures about 16-bit machines.  "GNUMACS will never work
     on that dink machine."  Probably derived from mainstream
     "dinky", which isn't sufficiently pejorative.
  
     See macdink.
  
     [{Jargon File]
  
     (1994-10-31)
  

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